Citizen Action Network for Accountability (CANA)

The Citizen Action Network for Accountability in the Philippines works to improve public services provided in our communities in general and to the poorest and most marginalized in particular.

CANA believes simply that more we ordinary people can understand and engage the government, the more accountable and effective we can all hold it to be.

Latest Work

Citizens force city to improve quality control of public works: A simple story on how citizen action compelled the government to repair a foot bridge previously declared complete yet unusable during rainy days.

Citizens encouraged to monitor government projects, spending: A national broadcast report in Filipino featuring CANA’s views and work in encouraging citizen action to fight corruption and demand for good governance.

Facebook: Citizen Action NetTwitter: @CitizenActionPH

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Borde Político A. C. – Borde Jurídico

Founded in 2012,  Borde Político is a NGO created with the purpose of developing digital tools for monitoring the performance of the Mexican Congress.

Through this platform, citizens can better know the work of their representatives and find interactive tools designed to function as simple mechanisms for consulting, displaying or disseminate relevant information related to both Chamber of the Mexican Congress.

Since 2013, through a specialized project named Borde Jurídico, the transparency effort extended to observe the work of the Judiciary Branch.

Its team consists of 13 people, which includes political scientists, designers, lawyers, philosophers and programmers is dedicated to digitize, illustrate and make available, in real time, information generated in the Congress and the Supreme Court. The digital platforms developed by Borde Político aim to encourage citizen contributions and debate to political processes and legislation.

In addition, Borde Político is part of the Opening Parliament Alliance (Mexico) and has established important partnerships to work on matters of open budget and legislative budgets with renowned civil society organizations in Mexico such as Fundar and Métrica Pública.

Twitter: @bordepolitico /@bordejuridicoFacebook: Borde Político, Borde Jurídico • Youtube: Borde Político, Borde Jurídico

Fin al abuso (1st Campaign)

The project measures the amount of money annually stolen and diverted from education in Mexico, and holds a permanent campaign to advertise and display what could have been done in the education field in Mexico with the money that is lost to corruption. Additionally, “Fin al abuso” encourages citizens to join electronic campaigns and take legal action to demand that money spent on education is rightly used.

First campaign

Following up a three years movement named “Where is my teacher?”, Fin al abuso is leading a group of organizations demand for a single, complete and reliable registry of basic education teachers. The obligation to submit such registry was established in the enactment of the Mexican Federal Spending Decrees for 2010, 2011, and 2012; however, it does not exist so far.

Fin al Abuso, has detected (by name) 22,353 people, who are paid an income as teachers or principals, yet are not teaching. These people are the so-called “union commissioners” (UC) teacher union workers whose salaries cost Mexicans at least 1.7 billion pesos every year.

 Mexicanos Primero

“¡Fin al abuso!”  denounced this wrongdoing in 2012 and invited Mexicans to join the demand of more money to be allocated for education and less to be given to the Teachers Union.

The campaign collected signatures at public spaces, universities and forums; and had broad media presence in Mexico City, Tepic, Tijuana, Guadalajara and Monterrey.

In three months 230,240 citizens signed the campaign and 115 NGOs supported the initiative.

With each collected signature a letter demanding public resources to be well used was sent to the President of Mexico, the presidents of the Senate and House of Representatives, and the Ministers of Education and of Finance. If these Union Commissioners are essential to the SNTE (teachers’ union), then they should be paid from union dues deducted from teacher salaries. Those who signed received a reply from the federal authorities.

SEP (Secretariat of Public Education) and the SNTE reacted differing only in regards to the number of UC: SEP reported that there were “only12,704 commissioners whilst the SNTE admitted having over 160,000 commissioners.

In a second conference, Fin al Abuso published a document supported by the National Bar Association of Mexico (Ilustre y Nacional Colegio de Abogados de México) concluding that the payment of UC from the federal treasury is illegal.

 

 Twitter: @Finalabuso    •   YouTube: MexicanosPrimero  • Facebook: FinAlAbuso

The holistic approach in fighting corruption in the judicial system

The major goal of the project was to conduct a national survey on corruption in the judicial system. This pilot survey was used as a model for similar surveys on a regional level in the subsequent years. Some of the main activities included: 1. research of the most common corruption practices resulting from legislative and judicial inadequacies; 2. interviews with prosecutors, judges and citizens; 3. publication of the surveys’ results including recommendations for countering corruption within the judicial system and for establishment of internal control mechanisms for restriction of the phenomenon; 4. monitoring of corruption signals related to the judicial system and publication of the results in the press; 5. closing conference ot the main research topic.

Transparent State

The goal of the project is to increase the transparency of public spending and of public activities in general. It achieves this goal primarily by providing data on public spending in a much more accessible way than usually and by checking governmental and semi- governmental bodies if they abide the law on freedom of electronic information (2005. XC. Law). It also produced a ranking of public institutions according to transparency.

Curbing system leakages: the health sector and licensing in Estonia

The Baltics social audit measured the public’s perception of the social phenomenon of corruption and their concrete experience with corrupt practices in the health care and licensing sectors. Final sample was 3388 households, 7526 people. The goal was to help reduce system leakages that result from petty corruption and to suggest actionable steps to improve the situation in the health and licencing sectors.

Results

  • Licensing 91% of applicants paid for the licence/permit.
  • 8% of applicants gave unofficial payment or gift for licence/permit.
  • Mostly paid inspector or admin staff Rating of government health services and perception of corruption in the services – corruption high/v high – 33% and Corruption not high/v high – 38%
  • Suggestions for change to government health services – 39% willing to pay to have the change in government health services.
  • Suggestions for change to family doctor services – 31% willing to pay for the change in family doctor service.
  • Suggestions for change to specialist doctor services – 40% willing to pay for the change in specialist doctor services. 59% of households answered they would be willing to pay to avoid a waiting list for surgery or other hospital treatment.

Study: „Access to the Public Information in Estonia“

The aim of the study was to analyze access to public information in Estonia. The Public Information Act (2000) was analyzed by comparing it with the relevant legislation of other countries. Four hundred requests for information were sent out to various public institutions and the responses to the request were analyzed.

Town Hall Bulletins without Censorship

A survey of over 500 volumes of town halls bulletins issued by over the 100 town halls in the Czech Republic was implemented; the aim of the survey was to identify important features such a bulletin should contain to fulfil the conditions of the free access to information, information on public funds spending and balanced reporting. It revealed only about 26% of the bulletins allowed for critical opinions to be published, the censorship was widespread and the political parties in the local governments used the bulletins for their own PR. The project outputs involved: detailed survey, analysis identifying rights and obligations related to publishing town hall bulletins and recommendations for improvements of legal regulations; codex of balanced town hall bulletin and ten basic rules for its publishing and a leaflet for the citizens “Apply your rights”.

Preventing Corruption in Journalism

Ministry of Justice and Transparency International-Estonia made contract in 2008 with purpose to map corruption extent in journalism, also to raise ethical and corruptional awareness. As a result of project there was carried out research „Transparency in Estonian (TI) Journalism“ by NGO Research and Training Center of Journalism. Research was concentrated on two aspects. Firstly there was analyzed how Estonian journalism is considering corruption and throught that is developing conception and notions of society. Second goal was to observe journalism itself as part of public government and possibility to be menaced. In addition one part of analyze is forming research about corruption and its connections with media in different societies by TI -Slovenian expert Simona Habič . In November 2009 there were trainings/seminars to journalists in Tallinn and Tartu about results of this research.

Partnership between the civil society and the administration – a guarantee for transparency, accountability and control

The project aimed at increasing the transparency and accountability of the regional and local administrations by providing mechanisms for control over their activities through the establishment of a strategic partnership with the civil society. Some of the activities that the project foresee are: 1. development of information channels between the administration and the civil society through information campaigns, TV channels (24 programs in total), brochures, publications in the media etc.; 2. selection and implementation of best practices with regard to transparency, accessibility and accountability in the selected municipal administrations; 3. realization of seminars, round tables, workshops as well as educational seminars for experts from the municipal administrations with representatives from the civil society sector; 4. realization of a “day of the open doors”” in the selected administrations; 5. development of a guidance document regarding the opportunities that a partnership between the civil society and the administration can offer.”

Youth initiative against corruption in Sliven

The project aimed to change the attitude of young people towards corruption through initiation of anti-corruption course in high-schools in the Sliven region. For the purpose, the project developed a program for anti-corruption education that included group simulations, case resolution in areas such as mediation and lobbying, money laundering, conflict of interests etc. Some of the project outputs included: 1. a sociological survey; 2. a round table with municipal representatives, lawyers, non-profit youth organizations, the civil association Public Barometer and students from the four surveyed schools; 3. development of a three-module training program; 4. a press conference.

Civic pressure on corruption and incompetence at local and state administration levels regarding illegal construction

The project was designed to fight against corruption in the municipal and state administration in the sphere of illegal construction. for the purpose an expert group monitoring the process of issuing construction licenses in the municipalities of Sofia was established during the actual project implementation. The project activities included: 1. analytical report on corrupt practices in cases of illegal building in Sofia Municipalities based on one-year survey; 2. development and dissemination of a brochure: “What Should We Know in Case of Illegal Building and Reconstruction””; 3. setting up of a citizens “”Complaints and Information Desk”” for legal assistance and lodgment of signals; 4. research and publicity on the municipal-level process of issuing construction licenses; 5. active public and media campaign to educate citizens about their rights in cases of illegal construction and to present the made disclosures of corruption in this field.”

Reducing Corruption in Estonia

The objective of the survey was to fit answers to the following questions:
1) how is corruption defined and to what extent it is condemned;
2) how far spread is corruption in the opinion of the respondents;
3) how frequent is exposure to corruption and what are the situations of potential exposure
4) what is the readiness to report cases of corruption;
5) what is the potential material and moral damage caused by corruption?

The survey was carried out in December 2004 in three parts: interviews with the general population of Estonia (1002 respondents, one-on-one interviews), entrepreneurs (503 respondents, telephone interviews) and employees of the public sector (901 respondents, internet interviews).

Promoting Active Citizen Engagement (ACTION) in Combating Corruption in Ukraine

The Project supported non-governmental monitoring and advocacy on priority areas in the fight against corruption, focusing particularly on issues identified by the Government of Ukraine in its Millennium Challenge Corporation (MCC) Threshold Country Plan. The ACTION Project carefully tracked corruption indicators in a consistent, detailed and regularized fashion using large national surveys, special sector surveys, citizen report cards, indicators that monitor procedural transactions and outcomes, and focus groups. The objectives of this tracking were to define a baseline for corruption levels in particular functions and sectors, to monitor progress (or backsliding) in advocacy or reform strategies, to mobilize civil society, business and the mass media to action, and to demonstrate to government the critical nature of corruption in an objective way that is hard to refute. The Three Key Components of the Promoting Active Citizen Engagement in Combating Corruption in Ukraine (ACTION) Project: 1) Measuring the Government of Ukraine’s (GOU) progress and long-term commitment in their fight against corruption; 2)Supporting for civil society advocacy and monitoring efforts; 3) Supporting investigative journalism and various other anti-corruption efforts concerning the media.

Research project: the participation of citizens in decision-making in 2009

The project goal was to analyze the perception and experiences of citizens and public officials regarding the participation of the citizens in decision-maiking. Finnally the CCI marks the progress in the influence of the citizens on decision making. The approch used for this analysis was the study of legal framework for the participation of citizens in decision-making and the research on the perception of citizens about their participation in decision-making.

Civil society in support of the public administration for more transparency, accessibility and accountability

The aim of the project was to increase the transparency, publicity and accountability of the municipal public administration through a strategic partnerships with the structures of the civil society. The project foresee: elevation of the current conditions regarding the transparency and accessibility in the work of the municipal administration; dissemination of the opportunities which the Law on Accessibility to Public Information gives to the structures of the civil society to control and monitor the work of the administration; provision of a basis for better cooperation between the municipal administration and the civil society and evaluation of best practices in the field in different EU countries. Some of the activities of the project include: 1. development and support of a web site of the association; 2. survey among civil society organizations regarding the level of transparency and accessibility of the public administration;3. development and publication of information materials concerning the project; 4. realization of educational events and round tables for the target groups – representatives of civil society organizations and experts from the municipal and regional administrations.

Corruption in Estonia: analyzing 3 different target groups 2004

The Survey ‘Corruption in Estonia’: analyzing 3 different target groups was first time carried out 2004. The objective of the survey “Corruption in Estonia: a survey of three target groups”” was to find answers to the following questions:

1) how is corruption defined and to what extent it is condemned;

2) how far spread is corruption in the opinion of the respondents;

3) how frequent is exposure to corruption and what are the situations of potential exposure;

4) what is the readiness to report cases of corruption;

5) what is the potential material and moral damage caused by corruption?

The survey was carried out in December 2004 in three parts:

  • interviews with the general population of Estonia (1002 respondents, one-on-one interviews),
  • entrepreneurs (503 respondents, telephone interviews) and
  • employees of the public sector (901 respondents, internet
    interviews).

Civil control over the work of court experts

The aim of the project was the elaboration of comprehensive analyses on the deficiencies in exercising control over the work of court experts. Another goal was the development, on the basis of the conducted analyses, of a set of ethical standards for the work of court experts as well as a model for their successful implementation within the practice of the courts. The implementation of the project included the elaboration of a legal analysis, aiming at identifying and investigating the gaps and loopholes in the Bulgarian legislation, regulating the work of court experts, as well as assessing the effectiveness of the existing mechanisms for control and liability of court experts. Furthermore, the project conducted a sociological survey, aiming at analyzing the tendencies in the existing public opinion, concerning the level of transparency in the work of court experts as well as the problems concerning their selection and control. Direct result of the implementation of the project was the elaboration and dissemination of the publication “Court Experts in Bulgaria – ethical standards and mechanisms for control over their activity”.

Creation of Anti-Corruption Program for Environmental Project Management Agency

In the end of 2007, TILS completed an analysis of the activity of Environmental Project Management Agency (EPMA) as well as the legal acts of the activity of the agency with regards to transparency and promotion of credibility. When conducting the analysis, information was collected from the employees of the agency on the basis of “focusing discussions” and questionnaire, internal legal acts on the activity of EPMA, information from EPMA‘s website www.apva.lt, data collected from EPMA “Rulebook Evaluation” that was implemented by National Development Institute in 2006 and data collected from EPMA activity audit that was conducted by National Audit Office. EPMA anti-corruption program “Open Doors“ that was based on previously collected data was prepared in 2008. The “Open Doors“ program determined most sensitive to corruption areas in the Agency, designed anti-corruption measures, furthermore, it contributed to the creation of motivation and ethics supervision system of EPMA employees.